Florida Food Policy Council

L E A D I N G  F L O R I D A  F O O D






Policy Snapshot

What's the scoop on food policy? Check our snapshots each month to see a localized challenge or success in the state of Florida!

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  • 5 Oct 2019 8:18 AM | Administrator (Administrator)


    In September, Florida lawmakers returned to the Capitol to begin committee meetings for the 2020 Legislative Session. Here’s a rundown of some of the issues covered that we know are important to you. 

    On September 17, the Agriculture Committee received an update from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services about hemp issues. The legislature passed SB 1020 on May 3 and it became law on July 1. The FDACS presentation highlighted points such as increasing interest in the hemp program by consumers and growers, collaboration with other government bodies for regulation, a timeline of the release of permits, and what lies ahead for farmers and best management practices. It was also announced that Fresh From Florida will be starting a hemp program to assist farmers with resources and education. After questions, representatives from hemp pilot projects at Florida A&M University and the University of Florida also shared test results with the committee.

    The full meeting can be viewed here. 

    The Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment and General Government met on September 18 for presentations on the transfer of Florida’s information technology by the Department of Management Services, on Agricultural Water Policy from the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and on invasive species impacts, prevention, and enforcement by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    The Director of the office of Agricultural Water Policy gave a presentation  on the responsibilities of OAWP, how those tasks are carried out, and explanations for specific budget requests. Specifically, how best management practices such as Nutritional Management BMPs, Irrigation Management BMPs and Water Resource Protection BMPsare created and how they are implemented to assist famers was discussed. A breakdown of how current and requested funding is used in research and BMP creation was also explained to the committee, as well as how hemp regulations will increase the need to employ more workers.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission then gave a presentation on invasive species. The main roles of the FWC were covered, which include prevention, control and management, and research support. One important point that was briefly mentioned was the economic costs and agricultural impacts that are seen from invasive species. 

    A video of the meeting is provided here. 

    The Appropriations Committee also convened on September 18 to hear a presentation on the Long-range Financial Outlook for the state of Florida compiled by the Florida Legislature Office of Economic and Demographic.  The Outlook includes economic, demographic, and debt analyses that provide a framework for financial projections and covers the upcoming three state fiscal years: 2020-21, 2021-22, and 2022-23.  

    In the Outlook, funding for programs within the Departments of Environmental Protection, Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission include: Water Projects, Drinking Water and Wastewater Revolving Loan Programs, Florida Keys, Herbert Hoover Dike, Florida Resilient Coastlines Program, Agricultural Programs, Citrus Canker Eradication Litigation and Fish and Wildlife Conservation Programs. 

    Notably, the report states that, “Agriculture continues to be an important industry in Florida. Based on a three-year average, $25.5 million in nonrecurring General Revenue funds and $6.2 million from trust funds are included for each fiscal year in the Outlook. This includes funding for water quality improvement initiatives and water conservation and supply planning. Funds are also included for the replacement of critical wildfire suppression equipment, promotional campaigns for agricultural commodities, citrus greening research and citrus health management areas, agricultural promotional and educational facilities, and the distribution of food to needy families through food pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters…  

    The use of General Revenue funds to support the Agricultural Emergency Eradication Trust Fund is also in the report, “Section 570.1912, Florida Statutes, requires an appropriation from the General Revenue Fund to the Agriculture Emergency Eradication Trust Fund in an amount equal to the previous year’s transfer into the trust fund from fuel tax collections. Based on the results of the August 2019 Transportation Revenue Estimating Conference, the Outlook includes nonrecurring General Revenue funds of $13.0 million in Fiscal Year 2020-21, $13.3 million in Fiscal Year 2021-22, and $13.7 million in Fiscal Year 2022-23.”  

    In regards to Natural Resources, funding for life and safety repairs for agricultural and wildlife conservation infrastructure located throughout the state is also mentioned. These improvements include, “state offices and laboratories, forestry wildfire prevention facilities, and state farmers markets. The Outlook includes a three-year average of $1.5 million of nonrecurring General Revenue and $4.5 million from trust funds for each of the Fiscal Years 2020-21 through 2022-23.” 

    The full Outlook contains a wide range of information which is available here, and the legislative meeting is viewable online here. 

    In the upcoming months, we will be following up with updates on legislative meetings and proposed food-related policies put forward by congress members. 


  • 28 Aug 2019 8:29 PM | Administrator (Administrator)

    2018-2020 Florida Senate Committee on Agriculture Members


    As a Floridian, by sharing your opinions and ideas with your representatives and senators in Tallahassee, you can help them decide what to do about the issues and pending legislation that affects us all. In order to do this, you need to know which representatives to contact and how to contact them.

    Below is a list of Senators on the 2018-2020 Committee on Agriculture, the food-related legislation they supported in 2019 and their contact information. 

    You can download a PDF version of this information here.

    Committee on Agriculture Members


    Chair  
    Ben Albritton  
    (R-District 26)  

    Introduced Bills:  

    -SB 628 Water Resources  

    -SB 880 Young Farmers and Ranchers 

    -SB 1058 State Hemp Program 

    -SB 1646 Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services 

    -SB 1804 Emergency Loans for Agricultural Producers

    Co-Introduced Bills:  

    -SB 66 Drinking Water in Public Schools  

    -SB 1020 State Hemp Program 


    Contact:

    Capitol Office  

    Phone:(850) 487-5026

    Address:308 Senate Building, 404 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100 

    Vice Chair
    George B. Gainer  
    (R-District 2)

     

    Co-Introduced Bills: 

    -SB 880 Young Farmers and Ranchers  

    Contact:

    Capitol Office

    Phone: (850) 487-5002

    Address:302 Senate Building, 404 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100

    Senator  
    Doug Broxson  
    (R-
    District 1)

     

    Introduced Bills:

    Contact:

    Capitol Office

    Phone: (850) 487-5001

    Address: 318 Senate Building, 404 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100

    Senator 
    Bill Montford
    (D-District 3)


    Introduced Bills:

    -SB 384 Medical Use of Marijuana in Schools

    -SB 998 Public Notification of Pollution

    -SB 110 Water Testing for Pollution

    -SB 1256 Apalachicola Bay Area of Critical State Concern

    Contact:

    Capitol Office

    Phone: (850) 487-5003

    Address:410 Senate Building, 404 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100

    Senator 
    Kevin J. Rader
    (D-District 29)

    Introduced Bills:

    -SB 486 Specialty License Plates/Florida State Beekeepers Association

    -SB 502 Prohibition of Plastic Carryout Bags and Straws

    -SB 510 Income Inequality Impact Statements

    -SB 108 Specialty License Plates/Florida Beekeepers Association

    Co-Introduced Bills:

    -SB 66 Drinking Water in Public Schools

    -SB 352 Shark Fins and Ray Parts

    Contact:

    Capitol Office

    Phone: (850) 487-5029

    Address: 222 Senate Building,  404 South Monroe Street,  Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100


  • 23 Aug 2019 8:55 AM | Administrator (Administrator)

    Legislation Update: Animals 

    With consumers becoming more conscious of the origins of food products, there have been many developments on the legislative front for animals. Businesses must take into account new regulations related to animal welfare, farming restrictions and bans on specific processes.  

    Below is a list of legislation related to animal production that was proposed on the Federal and State level in 2018-2019. 

    Federal Legislation 

    The Dog & Cat Meat Trade Prohibition Act (H.R. 6720), introduced by Florida Representatives Vern Buchanan and Alcee Hastings, passed the House on Sept. 122018. The bill was then incorporated under the H.R. 2 (115th): Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018.  

    The bill prohibits the slaughter of dogs and cats for human consumption. It also amends the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C. 2131 et seq.) to prohibit knowingly slaughtering dogs or cats for human consumption, as well as transporting, possessing, buying, selling, or donating of a dog or cat for such purposes and imposes penalties for violations. The provision does not limit any state or local law to protect animal welfare. 


    The Sustainable Shark Fisheries and Trade Act of 2019 (S.1008) was introduced to the Senate by Florida Senator Marco Rubio on April 3, 2019. 

    This bill is aimed at stopping the practice of shark finning and prohibit the import of shark products originating from any nation without a certification, as well as the possession of such products in the U.S. with limited exceptions for law enforcement, subsistence harvest, education, conservation or scientific research.  


    The Processing Revival & Intrastate Meat Exemption (PRIME) Act (H.R. 2859/S. 1620) was introduced by Representatives Thomas Massie and Chellie to Congress to the House on May 21, 2019. 

    The PRIME act would give individual states freedom to permit intrastate distribution of custom-slaughtered meat such as beef, pork or lamb to consumers, restaurants, hotels, boarding houses and grocery stores. 



    The 
    Farm and Ranch to School Act (H.R. 3090) of 2019, introduced by Representative Dusty Johnson, was introduced to the House on June 4, 2019. 

    The bill would amend the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act to include ranching educational activities in the Farm to School Program, specifically, “education activities in curriculum planning that encourage the participation of school children in ranching, livestock production, and meat processing educational activities. 


    Florida State Legislation 

    Senate Bill 352, introduced by Senator Joe Gruters, and Companion House Bill 99, introduced by Representative Kristin Jacobs, both died in Committees on May 3, 2019. 

    These bills would have banned the possession and sale of shark fins and ray parts in Florida. “Finning,” removing a shark’s fins and dumping the injured fish back into the ocean, is banned in Florida waters. But it is legal to remove and sell shark fins once boats return to the dock. In addition, a large number of imported shark fins enter the U.S. through Florida ports. 


  • 9 Aug 2019 1:37 PM | Administrator (Administrator)

    2018-2020 Florida House of Representatives
    Agriculture Committee Members


    As a Floridian, by sharing your opinions and ideas with your representatives and senators in Tallahassee, you can help them decide what to do about the issues and pending legislation that affects us all. However, you need to know which representatives to contact and how to contact them.

    Below is a list of Representatives, the food-related legislation they supported in 2019 and their contact information.

    Agriculture & Natural Resources Subcommittee (List 2 - 7/15 members)

    Representative Lawrence McClure

    (R-District 58)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/HB 1169 Displacement of Private Waste Companies

    -HB 4779University of Florida IFAS - STEM, Workforce & Student 4H Programs

    -HB 4991Enhancing the Next Generation Agriculture Program

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/HB 603 Single Use Plastic Straws

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5058

    Address: 1301 The Capitol
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative Anika Tene Omphroy

    (D-District 95)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 4939 Lauderhill Southeast Water Service Project
     


    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5095

    Address: 1302 The Capitol
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative Daniel Perez

    (R-District 116)


    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 3371 Little Havana Activities & Nutrition Centers of Dade County

    - Adult Day Care-HB 6037 Individual Wine Containers

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/HB 603Single-Use Plastic Straws

    -CS/HB 1169 Displacement of Private Waste Companies

    -HB 4507 Common Threads Obesity Prevention and Nutrition Education.

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5116

    Address: 1101 The Capitol
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative
    Sharon Pritchett

    (D-District 102)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5102

    Address: 300 House Office Building
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative
    William Cloud “Will” Robinson, Jr.

    (R-District 71)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5071

    Address: 1401 The Capitol
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative
    Tyler I. Sirois

    (R-District 51)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5051

    Address: 1301 The Capitol
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative
    Clovis Watson, Jr.

    (D-District 20)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 745 Alachua County

    -HB 3903 Eco-Industrial Park – Alachua

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    CS/CS/HB 333 State Hemp Program

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5020

    Address: 200 House Office Building
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300


  • 9 Aug 2019 12:23 PM | Administrator (Administrator)

    2018-2020 Florida House of Representatives
    Agriculture Committee Members


    As a Floridian, by sharing your opinions and ideas with your representatives and senators in Tallahassee, you can help them decide what to do about the issues and pending legislation that affects us all. However, you need to know which representatives to contact and how to contact them.

    Below is a list of Representatives, the food-related legislation they supported in 2019 and their contact information.

    Agriculture & Natural Resources Subcommittee (List 1 - 8/15 members)

    List 2 can be viewed here


    Chair
    Chuck Clemons

    (R-District 21)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 3029 Feeding Florida Healthy Food Initiative

    -HB 3167Preparing the Next Generation Agricultural Education Student

    -HB 3291 Flagler County Safe Drinking Water and Wastewater Project

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/CS/HB 333State Hemp Program

    -CS/CS/HB771 Environmental Regulation

    Contact:

    Capitol Office: 

    Phone: (850) 717-5021

    Address: 209 House Office Building 
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300


    Vice Chair
    Holly Raschein

    (R-District 120)

    2019 Sponsored Bills: 

    -HB 1229 Craft Distilleries

    -HB 1395 Water Quality Improvements-HB 4735 Little Havana Activities & Nutrition Centers of Dade County, Inc. -Elderly Meals Program

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/CS/HB 105Domestic Wastewater Collection System Assessment and Maintenance

    -CS/CS/HB 333 State Hemp Program-HB 4507 Common Threads Obesity Prevention and Nutrition Education

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5120

    Address: 418 The Capitol 
    402 South Monroe Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Democratic Ranking Member

    Delores D. “D” Hogan Johnson

    (D-District 84)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 2219 Treasure Coast Food Bank Food Production Plant Land Acquisition and Renovations

    -HB 3151 United Against Poverty Capital Improvements & Training

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5084

    Address: 1302 The Capitol402 South Monroe StreetTallahassee, FL 32399-1300


    Representative Robert Charles Brannan III

    (R-District 10)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/HB 1215 Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 3167 Preparing the Next Generation Agricultural Education Student

    -HB 4779 University of Florida IFAS - STEM, Workforce & Student 4H Programs

    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5010

    Address: 1101 The Capitol402 South Monroe StreetTallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative Elizabeth Anne Fetterhoff 

    (R-District 26)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/HB 145Vegetable Gardens-HB 4707Stetson University

    - Water Institute/St. Johns River Field Station

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/HB 141 Water Quality Improvements


    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5026

    Address: 1401 The Capitol402 South Monroe StreetTallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative Mike Hill

    (R-District 1)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/HB 1125Tobacco Products

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 545 Drinking Water in Public Schools

    -CS/HB 603 Single Use Plastic Straws


     Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5001

    Address: 1101 The Capitol402 South Monroe StreetTallahassee, FL 32399-1300


    Representative Kristin Diane

    (D-District 96)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -CS/CS/HB 105Domestic Wastewater Collection System Assessment and Maintenance

    -HB 1199 Water Resources


    Contact:

    Capitol Office:

    Phone: (850) 717-5096

    Address: 200 House Office Building402 South Monroe StreetTallahassee, FL 32399-1300

    Representative Chris Latvala

    (R-District 67)

    2019 Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 2555 Strategic Policy Plan for Florida's Oceans and Coasts 

    Co-Sponsored Bills:

    -HB 2319 Water Resources Operator Vocational Training Program


    Contact:

    Capitol Office: 

    Phone: (850) 717-5067

    Address: 222 The Capitol402 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32399-1300



  • 10 Jul 2019 12:03 PM | Administrator (Administrator)


    Florida’s 2019 new fiscal year started on July 1st. Lawmakers passed 195 bills this year and the Governor has been signing those that successfully made it through both the House and Senate. 

    Governor Desantis signed a new $90.9 billion budget and vetoed $131 million in projects and spending decisions. Below we have highlighted bills related to food policy that were signed into law.  

    View a full version of our summary in this pdf.

    You can read summaries of all the bills on the Florida Senate website here and vetoed bills can be viewed in this searchable pdf.

    Signed Bills  

    Bill 

    Name 

    Date Signed 

    Details 

    SB 182 

    Medical Use of Marijuana 

    3/18/2019 

    Provides an exception to the requirement that such devices must be purchased from a medical marijuana treatment center for devices that are intended for the medical use of marijuana by smoking; redefines the term “medical use” to include the possession, use, or administration of marijuana in a form for smoking; restricting the smoking of marijuana in enclosed indoor workplaces; requires a qualified physician to submit specified documentation to the Board of Medicine and the Board of Osteopathic Medicine upon determining that smoking is an appropriate route of administration for a qualified patient, other than a patient diagnosed with a terminal condition, etc. 

    SB 320 


    Residential Conservation Programs   


    5/3/2019 

    Authorizes the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to organize, staff, equip, and operate residential conservation programs for a specified purpose, etc. 

    HB 745 

    Alchua County 

    5/10/2019 

    Provides an exception to general law; authorizes business licensed to sell alcoholic beverages for consumption on premises within specified area to sell such beverages for consumption off premises; provides boundaries. 

    HB 1099 


    City of Kissimmee, Osceola County  

      

    5/10/2019 

    Creates an overlay district; provides boundaries; provides exception to general law; requires DBPR to issue special alcoholic beverage license to certain establishments; provides penalties; prohibites subsequent licensure application for specified period. 

    HB 1351 


    City of St. Cloud, Osceola County 

      

    6/4/2019 

    Creates a special zone; provides boundaries; provides exception to general law; provides space, seating, & minimum gross revenue requirements for special alcoholic beverage licenses for certain restaurants. 

    SB 82 


    Vegetable Gardens 


    6/24/2019  

    Prohibits local governments from regulating vegetable gardens on residential properties except as otherwise provided by law; specifies that such regulations are void and unenforceable, etc. 

    SB 1020 

    State Hemp Program 

    6/25/2019 

    Creates the state hemp program within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services; requires licensees to use specified hemp seeds and cultivars; revises the colleges and universities at which the department is required to authorize and oversee the development of industrial hemp pilot projects; removes a condition for the implementation of industrial hemp commercialization projects, etc. 

    SB 1552  


    Florida Red Tide Mitigation and Technology Development Initiative 

      

    6/20/2019 

    Establishes the Florida Red Tide Mitigation and Technology Development Initiative; requires the initiative to submit an annual report by a specified date to the Governor, the Legislature, the Secretary of Environmental Protection, and the executive director of the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; establishing the Initiative Technology Advisory Council, etc.  

    SB 2500 

    Appropriations 

    6/21/2019 

    Provides money for the annual period beginning July 1, 2019, and ending June 30, 2020, and supplemental appropriations for the period ending June 30, 2019, to pay salaries, and other expenses, capital outlay - buildings, and other improvements, and for other specified purposes of the various agencies of state government, etc. APPROPRIATION: $91,106,375,235  

      

  • 13 Jun 2019 3:20 PM | Administrator (Administrator)

    June Food Policy Snapshot 

    May 3rd was the last day of the regular session for the Florida Legislature. Many bills passed and were sent to the Governor’s office to be signed while others died in committee meetings. Here is an overview of Senate bills related to food policy. Bills can be found on the Florida House of Representative's website here. Simply enter the bill number in the search bar.

    You can also download the full Senate and House Bills Snapshot PDF version by clicking here.

    Senate Bills 

    Number

    Title

    Filed By

    Last Action

    SB 66 

    Drinking Water in Public Schools 

    Cruz 

    Died in Appropriations Committee 

    SB 82 

    Vegetable Gardens 

    Bradley 

    Order Enrolled 

    SB 88 

    Preemption of Recyclable and Polystyrene Materials 

    Stewart 

    Died in Community Affairs 

    SB 220 

    Beverage Law 

    Brandes 

    Died in Innovation, Industry, and Technology 

    SB 242 

    Beverage Law 

    Hutson 

    Died in Innovation, Industry, and Technology 

    SB 352 

    Shark Fins and Ray Parts 

    Gruters 

    Died in Environment and Natural Resources 

    SB 502 

    Prohibition of Plastic Carryout Bags and Straws 

    Rader 

    Died in Commerce and Tourism 

    SB 628 

    Water Resources 

    Albritton 

    Died in Infrastructure and Security 

    SB 672 

    Beverage Container Deposits

     

    Farmer 

    Died in Environment and Natural Resources 

    SB 694 

    Disposable Plastic Bags 

    Rodriguez 

    Died in Community Affairs 

    SB 816 

    Environmental Regulation 

    Perry 

    Laid on Table - Refer to CS/CS/HB 771 -SJ 607  

    SB 880 

    Young Farmers and Ranchers 

    Gainer 

    Died in Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment, and General Government 

    SB 894 

    Individual Wine Containers 

    Stargel 

    Died in Innovation, Industry, and Technology 

    SB 962 

    Malt Beverages 

    Diaz 

    Died in Commerce and Tourism 

    SB 1020 

    State Hemp Program 

    Bradley 

    Ordered engrossed, then enrolled -SJ 895  

    SB 1058 

    State Hemp Program 

    Albritton 

    Died in Innovation, Industry, and Technology 

    SB 1100 

    Water Testing for Pollution 

    Montford 

    Died in Appropriations Subcommittee on Health and Human Services 

    SB 1340 

    Water Pollution Operation Permits 

    Cruz 

    Died in Environment and Natural Resources 

    SB 1558 

    Fees/State Hemp Program Registration 

    Rodriguez 

    Died in Innovation, Industry, and Technology 

    SB 1716

    Fertilizers 

    Bracy

    Died in Agriculture 

    SB 1804 

    Emergency Loans for Agricultural Producers 

    Albritton  

    Died in Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment, and General Government 

    SB 7088 

    Fees/State Hemp Program 

    Agriculture 

    Died in Appropriations 

    SB 7102 

    Hemp 

    Innovation, Industry and Technology 

    Died on Calendar 


  • 13 Jun 2019 3:15 PM | Administrator (Administrator)

    June Food Policy Snapshot 

    May 3rd was the last day of the regular session for the Florida Legislature. Many bills passed and were sent to the Governor’s office to be signed while others died in committee meetings. Here is an overview of House bills related to food policy. House bills can be found on the Florida House of Representative's website here. Simply enter the bill number in the search bar.

    You can also download the full Senate and House Bills Snapshot PDF version by clicking here.

    House Bills

    Number

    Title

    Filed By

    Last Action

    HB 145 

    Vegetable Gardens 

    Local, Federal and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee; Fetterhoff; (Co-introducers) Sabatini 

    Laid on Table - HJ 1097    

    HB 157 

    Fertilizers 

    Thompson;  (Co-introducers) Eskamani; Mercado 

    Died in Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee

    HB 333

    State Hemp Program 

    State Affairs Committee; Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee; Massullo; Killebrew; (Co-introducers) Bell; Buchanan; Byrd; Clemons; Cortes; Daniels; Eskamani; Grieco; Hart; LaMarca; Payne; Polsky; Raschein; Roth; Sabatini; Smith, D.; Watson, C. 

    Laid on Table -HJ 1097 

    HB 545 

    Drinking Water in Public Schools 

    Jenne;  (Co-introducers) Alexander; Antone; Cortes; Duran; Eskamani; Fernandez; Geller; Grieco; Hart; Hill; Mercado; Silvers; Smith, C.; Stark; Toledo 

    Died in PreK-12 Quality Subcommittee  

    HB 771 

    Environmental Regulation 

      

    State Affairs Committee; Local, Federal and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee; Overdorf; (Co-introducers) Clemons 

    Vetoed by Governor 

      

    HB 853 

    Beverage Container Deposits 

    Stark; (Co-introducers) Fernandez 


    Died in Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee 

    HB 907 

    Beverage Law 

    Toledo 

    Withdrawn prior to introduction -HJ 93  

    HB 1215 

    Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services 

    Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee; Brannan 

      

    Died in State Affairs Committee

    HB 1219 

    Beverage Law 

    Sabatini; (Co-introducers)  

    La Rosa; Smith, D. 

      

    Died in Innovation, Industry, and Technology  

    HB 2071 

    Southeastern Food Bank – Food Outreach Program

    Cortes 


    Died in Agriculture and Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee 

    HB 2219 

    Treasure Coast Food Bank Food Production Plant Land Acquisition and Renovations 

    Hogan Johnson 

      

    See SB2500 (line item 1552A)   

    HB 2389 

    Curley's House of Style Inc./Hope Relief Food Bank - Elderly Meals and Social Programs 

    Bush 

    Died in Appropriations Committee

    HB 2419 

    All Faiths Food Bank Warehouse Expansion 

    Gregory 

      

    Died in Appropriations Committee   

    HB 2623 

    Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida Culinary Training Program 

    Brown;  

    (Co-introducers) Mercado 

      

    Died in Appropriations Committee 

    HB 3029 

    Feeding Florida Healthy Food Initiative 

    Clemons 

      

    See SB2500 (line item 1547) 

    HB 3087 

    North Miami Food Pantry 

    Joseph 

      

    Died in Appropriations Committee 

    HB 3413 

     Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida 

    Eagle; (Co-introducers) Fitzenhagen 

      

    Died in Appropriations Committee   

    HB 3965 

    First Coast Fresh Food Innovation Center 

     Payne 

      

    Died in Agriculture and Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee 

    HB 4423 

    Haitian American Food Bank of South Florida 

    Jacquet 

      

    Died in Agriculture and Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee 

    HB 9083 

    All Faiths Food Bank - New Food and Resource Center in DeSoto County 

     Bell 

      

    Died in Appropriations Committee   


  • 26 Apr 2019 10:28 AM | Rachel (Administrator)

    Agricultural Resilience and Food Security FLFPC - Policy Committee

    Presentation - Dell deChant, FLFPC Board Member and Policy Committee Co-Chair

    Based on five concepts related to agricultural resilience and food security


    * Agricultural Resilience "Agricultural resilience is about equipping farmers to absorb and recover from shocks and stresses to their agricultural production and livelihoods. Some shocks are short-term, others long-term.  Some come suddenly while others are predictable.  And some are more severe while others slowly erode farmers’ ability to farm."  - From Farming First https://farmingfirst.org/resilience 


    * Security and Insecurity  "Food security is defined as the availability of food and one's access to it. A household is considered food secure when its occupants do not live in hunger or fear of starvation. Stages of food insecurity range from food secure situations to full-scale famine. The World Food Summit of 1996 defined food security as existing 'when all people at all times have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life.' " - Disabled World, https://www.disabled-world.com/fitness/nutrition/foodsecurity/


    * Sustainabilty sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” - UN Commission on Environment and Development)

    https://www.sustain.ucla.edu/about-us/what-is-sustainability/



    * Food Sovereignty Food sovereignty is the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. It puts the aspirations and needs of those who produce, distribute and consume food at the heart of food systems and policies rather than the demands of markets and corporations.”– Declaration of Nyéléni, the first global forum on food sovereignty, Mali, 2007. 

    See also: U.S. Food Sovereignty Alliance, http://usfoodsovereigntyalliance.org/what-is-food-sovereignty/


    * Urban Food Sovereignty Urban Food Sovereignty is here conceived as the right of persons in urban ecosystems to define their own food and agriculture policies and practices, and to produce healthy and culturally appropriate food through their own means using ecologically sound and sustainable methods, independent of industrial food systems. - USF Urban Food Sovereignty Group .  

    See website  https://sites.google.com/site/urbanfoodsovereigntygroup/home




    Beyond Definitions:

    Cultural Context: Who defines terms, develops data, engages media?  Whose insecurity is this?


    Ecological Context: To what extent is the ecological crisis considered? Whose sustainability is this?


    Political Context: Who is at the table?  What are the power relationships: Federal, state, local?


    Agrarian Context: Is there an alternative to the industrial food system? 



    * Policy Reflection Topic


    Legislation prohibiting home rule on vegetable gardens - Senate Bill 82, House Bill 145.


    https://www.watchdog.org/florida/florida-senate-oks-garden-variety-preemption-bill-to-keep-government/article_915f3c64-4c3c-11e9-b911-53517aa8242f.html


    http://floridapolitics.com/archives/294062-right-to-grow-vegetables


    Good accessible texts on Food Sovereignty and Food Justice 


    Big Hunger: The Unholy Alliance Between Corporate America and Anti-Hunger Groups – Andrew Fisher


    Food as a Human Right: Combatting Global Hunger and Forging a Path to Food Sovereignty -  Will Schanbacher 


    Food Justice – Robert Gottlieb and Anupama Joshi


    Food Sovereignty: Reconnecting Food, Nature and Community – Hannah Wittman, et al (eds)


    Grounded Vision: New Agrarianism and the Academy – William Major


    The Politics of Food: The Global Conflict Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty - Will Schanbacher 


    Religious Agrarianism: And the Return of Place – Todd Le Vasseur


  • 21 Feb 2019 2:26 PM | Florida Food (Administrator)

    UPDATE: Policy Committee Meeting Presentation Available Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAeLNi2yiXE&t=15s

    ---

    By Jennifer Parker

    FLFPC Secretary and Policy Committee Co-Chair

    Until recent, the most pressing nutrition and health issues were product of undernutrition due to insufficient food production. To remedy this, governments sought to stimulate production of the most durable, high calorie and inexpensive food commodities (ie. potatoes, corn, wheat etc). This urgent need to increase food production for human survival, however, turned a model that addressed one particular crisis into a mode of profitability, which has since seen rates of obesity and chronic diet related diseases, including type 2 diabetes, Cardiovascular diseases as well as several types of cancers to skyrocket.

    Even with the unprecedented rise in obesity and diet related diseases, government policies have continued to emphasize agricultural production of the same high calorie, inexpensive food commodities. While undernutrition has improved, governments (within the US, UK, CAN and the like), have tended to direct responsibility at individuals in response to the rise in these chronic diseases. Examples of the measures governments use to educate individuals which emphasize personal responsibility and choice are through such initiatives as USDA dietary guidelines, food labels, menu labelling, and clinical counselling.

    The extent to which people have real choices, however, is debatable (1,2,3,4,5,6,7); while we all like to believe that we choose our food freely, the overwhelming evidence is that our choices are constrained by history, class, gender, income, ethnicity and market issues of access, affordability and global supply patterns. (8) However, it gets even more complicated. There are also psychological influences include attitudes to food and health, incentives, motivation, and values.(9) Food preferences may also be influenced by early life exposures, including the mother’s diet during pregnancy, infant feeding practices, and foods consumed in early childhood. (10,11,12) Broader sociocultural determinants of personal choices include household lifestyle patterns such as television watching and sleep, (13,14,15,16) family and community norms, social pressures, social class, social networks, and race/ethnicity. (17) The local environment also plays an important role.(2,3,4,5,6,7)

    There is an argument that individuals rather simply select than actually choose food items freely. (8) There appear to be many choices in grocery stores hosting over 40,000 products for consumers to “choose”, however, when these 40,000 products are produced by only 5 companies, it raises the question on who truly controls the food supply, and thus the influences on the food chain and the food choices of individual and communities. Thus to focus public health nutrition initiatives solely on helping individuals make healthier food choices limits the extent to which improvements in public health can be made.

    Below is useful list of recommended actions and roles governments can take to improve nutrition and health. This list was published in the British Medical Journal by Dariush Mozaffarian and colleagues (such as Tim Lang) who are prominent stakeholders in the fight for a healthier, sustainable, fair and just food system. These roles and actions are also a great tool for Florida’s Food Policy Council to weigh and assess initiatives going forward in addressing nutrition and policy efforts.

    Recommended government roles and actions for a healthier food system (18)

    1. Recognise that good nutrition is a priority for local, national, and global health, equity, and economic security

    2. Acknowledge the importance of multilevel approaches, not “magic bullets”, in order to implement strategic, coordinated government action. Based on current evidence, the best approaches are:

    3. Fiscal incentives/disincentives (eg, taxes and subsidies) for consumers, the food industry, and organisations (eg, worksites)

    4. Prioritisation of both food security and nutritional quality in food assistance programmes

    5. Appropriate standards for additives including trans fat, sodium, and added sugars

    6. Procurement standards for all government food purchases and venues including food assistance programmes

    7. Use of schools and worksites to promote healthier eating

    8. Incorporation of food and nutrition into the healthcare system at all levels

    9. Nutrition standards for marketing of foods and beverages to children

    10. Front-of-pack labelling of evidence informed metrics such as overall fat quality (eg, unsaturated to saturated fat ratio), carbohydrate quality (eg, carbohydrate to fibre ratio), and sodium

    11. Implement policies using the best available evidence, which also provides an opportunity to build further evidence for better decision making by evaluation of the policies being implemented

    12. Emphasise strategies with the greatest potential to reduce social and racial/ethnic disparities from clustering of suboptimal diet habits, local environments, and disease risk factors

    13. Increase support for food and nutrition research to ensure that both dietary targets and policy efforts are scientifically sound

    14. Support public-private partnerships with the food industry and other major non-food businesses (eg, private health and life insurance, and self-insured corporations) for research and development on healthier products, effective behaviour change, and other common aims. This must include development of clear and transparent policies to identify and minimise conflicts of interest

    15. Facilitate participation of other stakeholders in policy development, implementation, and evaluation

    16. Incorporate nutrition and health in all of government, for example, city planning, economic development, agricultural and trade policies, and nutrition impact assessment

    17. Link nutrition and food policies to economic and production indices such as the influence of diet related illness and health on production and the economy

    18. Create a ministerial or cabinet leadership position with oversight and budgetary authority for cross agency food and nutrition policy

    19. Support monitoring and evaluation of nutrition habits, food systems, and corresponding policies including for individuals, communities, and larger systems. Link to and use existing surveillance systems (eg, healthcare) as well as new technologies (eg, social media, and personal monitors)

    20. Identify and use complementary global public health activities (eg, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals), including to bring stakeholders together and, where necessary, counter the food industry

    Join FLFPC’s next policy committee’s monthly call, March 29th at 12 noon EST until 1pm, where we will discuss the challenges and ways in which we can address pressing nutrition and health issues across Florida and the rest of the United States.

    Topic: Nutrition and Policy

    Time: Mar 29, 2019 12:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://us04web.zoom.us/j/313503457

    One tap mobile

    +16465588656,,313503457# US (New York)

    +14086380968,,313503457# US (San Jose)

    Dial by your location

    +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)

    +1 408 638 0968 US (San Jose)

    Meeting ID: 313 503 457

    Find your local number: https://us04web.zoom.us/u/fcn3bbKWkq

    References

    1. Lang T. The new globalisation, food and health: is public health receiving its due emphasis? Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 1998; 52: 538–9.

    2. Brown GW, Yamey G, Wamala SAfshin A, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Schmidt LA, Mozaffarian D. Dietary policies to reduce non-communicable diseases. In: Brown GW, Yamey G, Wamala S, eds. The handbook of global health policy.1st ed. Wiley, 2014:175-93. doi:10.1002/9781118509623.ch9

    3. Mozaffarian D, Afshin A, Benowitz NL, et al., American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism, Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Council on the Kidney in Cardiovasc. Population approaches to improve diet, physical activity, and smoking habits: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation2012;126:1514-63. doi:10.1161/CIR.0b013e318260a20b pmid:22907934Abstract/FREE Full Text Google Scholar

    4. Afshin A, Penalvo J, Del Gobbo L, et al. CVD prevention through policy: a review of mass media, food/menu labeling, taxation/subsidies, built environment, school procurement, worksite wellness, and marketing standards to improve diet. Curr Cardiol Rep2015;17:98. doi:10.1007/s11886-015-0658-9 pmid:26370554

    5. World Cancer Research Fund International. NOURISHING framework. 2017. https://www.wcrf.org/int/policy/nourishing-database Google Scholar

    6. Informas. The Healthy Food Environment Policy Index (Food-EPI). 2017. http://www.informas.org/food-epi/Google Scholar

    7. Food-PRICE. Food Policy Review and Intervention Cost-Effectiveness (Food-PRICE). 2018. https://www.food-price.org/Google Scholar

    8. Caraher, M. & Coveney, J. (2004). Public health nutrition and food policy. Public Health Nutrition, 7(5), pp. 591-598. doi: 10.1079/PHN2003575

    9. van’t Riet J, Sijtsema SJ, Dagevos H, De Bruijn GJ. The importance of habits in eating behaviour. An overview and recommendations for future research. Appetite2011;57:585-96. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2011.07.010 pmid:21816186

    10. Nehring I, Kostka T, von Kries R, Rehfuess EA. Impacts of in utero and early infant taste experiences on later taste acceptance: a systematic review. J Nutr2015;145:1271-9. doi:10.3945/jn.114.203976 pmid:25878207Abstract/FREE Full TextGoogle Scholar

    11. Liem DG, Mennella JA. Sweet and sour preferences during childhood: role of early experiences .Dev Psychobiol2002;41:388-95. doi:10.1002/dev.10067 pmid:12430162

    12. DiSantis KI, Collins BN, Fisher JO, Davey A. Do infants fed directly from the breast have improved appetite regulation and slower growth during early childhood compared with infants fed from a bottle?Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act2011;8:89. doi:10.1186/1479-5868-8-89 pmid:21849028

    13. Robinson TN. Reducing children’s television viewing to prevent obesity: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA1999;282:1561-7. doi:10.1001/jama.282.16.1561 pmid:10546696

    14. Epstein LH, Roemmich JN, Robinson JL, et al. A randomized trial of the effects of reducing television viewing and computer use on body mass index in young children. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med2008;162:239-45. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2007.45doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2007.45 pmid:18316661

    15. Mozaffarian D, Hao T, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB. Changes in diet and lifestyle and long-term weight gain in women and men. N Engl J Med2011;364:2392-404. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1014296 pmid:21696306

    16. Patel SR, Hu FB. Short sleep duration and weight gain: a systematic review. Obesity (Silver Spring)2008;16:643-53. doi:10.1038/oby.2007.118 pmid:18239586

    17. Brug J, Kremers SP, Lenthe Fv, Ball K, Crawford D. Environmental determinants of healthy eating: in need of theory and evidence. Proc Nutr Soc2008;67:307-16. doi:10.1017/S0029665108008616 pmid:18700052

    18. Mozaffarian D, Angell SY, Lang T, Rivera JA. Role of government policy in nutrition—barriers to and opportunities for healthier eating. BMJ 2018; 361 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k2426 (Published 13 June 2018) BMJ 2018;361:k2426

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